Marmon Big Trucks: Just Needs A Detroit Diesel V16

Another branch of Marmon-Herrington’s many activities was the manufacturing of large trucks. It was a low-volume marginal affair, and production ceased in 1963. But the truck brand name was sold to a new entity,which built large over-the-road trucks from 1963 until 1997. Marmon was strictly a low volume built-to-order firm, and thus earned the nick-name “the Rolls Royce of Trucks”. Now if I had a vintage Marmon truck, I’d  just have to drop in a DD 16V-71. I googled ferociously on the assumption someone else had thought of it, but no such luck. Is there a shortage of imagination among truckers? But here’s a couple of others to gaze at anyway:

During my hitchhiking years, I only scored one ride in a Marmon, a cab-over unit, as most were then east of the Rockies. I knew of Marmon’s rep, and felt privileged to climb up into the R-R of trucks. Well, I can assure you there were no Conolly hides, walnut burl dash or Wilton wool carpets. It was a dark and loud vinyl cave, and reeked of a mixture of diesel and BO. But a Marmon had status at the truck stop, thanks to that big M on the front.